<$BlogRSDUrl$> Marcus P. Zillman, M.S., A.M.H.A. Author/Speaker/Consultant
Marcus P. Zillman, M.S., A.M.H.A. Author/Speaker/Consultant
Internet Happenings, Events and Sources

Friday, November 28, 2014  

SimplySecure - Usably Secure Technologies

Simply Secure is a small but growing organization. We have expertise in usability research, design, software development, and product management, and are supported by a diverse set of advisors and partners. In brief, they are a service organization. They are here to help the existing open–source security community do what it does – better. They don’t want to own it, they don’t want to invent it. They believe in collaboration and portable resources, developed with a broad coalition of smart, enthusiastic practitioners. Their ground rules are: a) They work on open source projects - Security and privacy technologies must be trustworthy; to be trustworthy, they need to be open to scrutiny and validation. At the heart of open source is an openness to this type of scrutiny, and a willingness to work collaboratively to fix problems and improve as a part of earning this trust; b) They aim to enable broadly-useful communications technologies - Usability isn’t just design. It means providing pleasant, workable technology that meets users needs and expectations. They believe that this means allowing users to continue using the platforms and services they’re comfortable with. For this reason, their primary focus will be on technology that secures communication on top of existing platforms and services. How can they encrypt on top of popular name-brand, consumer-facing cloud services?; and c) They commit to running our organization transparently - They are working to solve unsolved problems, which means they will make mistakes. They believe that their mistakes can be as instructive as our successes, and they commit to being open about both in ways that help the community learn, recycle, and improve on our methodologies. This will be added to Privacy Resources Subject Tracer™.

posted by Marcus Zillman | 2:34 AM
subject tracers™